articles

Periodic Fever Syndrome: A Case Study of Biofilm-Mediated Fever and Successful Treatment with Fibrinolytic Enzymes and Natural Antimicrobials

Periodic Fever Syndrome (PFS) is highlighted by a fever with or without additional symptoms. The underlying cause is suspected to be hereditary in nature from a genetic mutation. An underlying cause that is not commonly considered or diagnosed is a biofilm-related infection. A biofilm’s natural cycle of growth-release-repeat provides an episodic flow of microorganism into the body to cause a fever and the asymptomatic periods in-between typical in a PFS patient. The microorganisms being released can be bacterial, viral, fungal or a combination which triggers the periodic fevers while the biofilm acts as barrier hiding the infection from detection and drug therapies. A treatment protocol using fibrinolytic enzymes and a broad-spectrum antimicrobial may be an effective treatment for PFS not associated with a genetic mutation.

By
Steven Zodkoy, DC, CNS, DCBCN, DACBN

Bilateral Fibrocystic Breasts, Dysmenorrhea, and Anemia: A Case Report of Lugol’s Iodine & GLA Borage Oil

Bilateral Fibrocystic Breast is the most common form of benign breast disease and besides tender breasts is clinically associated with a relative risk for the subsequent development of cancer. We present a successful reversal of macrocytic anemia using iron bisglycinate, B-vitamins, and protein powder alongside symptomatic regression of bilateral fibrocystic breast with correction of concomitant mastodynia and dysmenorrhea using therapeutic iodine paired with estrogen metabolite support with GLA, DIM, I3C, and estrogen excretion with Calcium D-Glucarate.

By
Jennifer Gantzer, DC, MS, DACBN, FACN

Health Benefits of Polyphenols and Anthocyanins Found In Food

The complex polyphenol class of anthocyanins and polyphenols in general exhibit strong antioxidant properties in vitro. Plant foods and beverages derived from them contain polyphenols, one of the main antioxidants. Polyphenols appear to be beneficial to health based on the evidence in the literature. Their bioavailability and transport from the circulation to the target organs are required for their bioactivity in vivo. The effects of polyphenols and especially anthocyanins on antioxidant capacity have been relatively poorly studied to date. Various studies have shown that foods that contain polyphenols are associated with positive health outcomes due to their wide availability in a variety of foods that people consume on a daily basis. Finally, as a result of their capacity to enhance exercise recovery, anthocyanins (ACN), the sub-class of polyphenols responsible for the red, blue, and purple pigmentation of fruits and vegetables, have gained considerable interest in sport and exercise research.

By
Adrian Isaza, PhD, DC, MD, DABCI, DACBN, CCAP

Under-appreciated Issues In The Treatment of Chronic Illness – Muscle/Dietary Protein Update Part I

Upon finishing part III of my metabolic acidosis/potassium series, I had every intention of writing part IV right after. However, as the time came to write part IV, I decided that, while there is still a large volume of research on this issue that I will be reviewing in future newsletters, I needed to take a break from this subject for a short period of time. Why? During the last few months a literal avalanche of research on another grossly under-appreciated issue in the treatment of chronic illness, loss of muscle mass and the need for increased protein intake, has been published. Some of these papers, in particular the two I am about to review in this and the next newsletter, are, to me, so compelling and so desperately relevant to the needs of today’s ever-growing volume of aging chronically ailing patients, that I felt, in good conscience, I could not delay writing about them until I had finished the metabolic acidosis/potassium series. Therefore, to start the new year, I want to re-emphasize the need to consider muscle mass and increased protein need for literally every chronically ill patient, particularly those who are aged 50 years and older.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

Review: A Vicious Cycle: Using Nutrition to Combat the Behavioral Impact of Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) are mood disorders experienced by women of child-bearing age who are regularly experiencing their menstrual cycles. Symptoms experienced negatively impact women cognitively, socially, emotionally, and physically.

By
Alexandra Trezza, Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MPH, MS, DACBN, FACN, CISSN, CSCS

Look to the Mitochondria When Fatigue is a Primary Complaint

Many patients report fatigue as a major complaint when coming in for office visits. The patient may have other complaints as well, so the fatigue is often overlooked or dismissed as irrelevant or not the central issue. If energy production via the mitochondria is not addressed then the patient will have poorer outcomes. It is now relatively easy to obtain a genetic test to observe the single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs, that impact mitochondrial function. There are multiple factors that impact mitochondrial energy production and this article addresses several of those factors including some of the nutrients that support energy production and the SNPs associated.

By
Valorie J. Prahl, DC, DACBN

Causes and Consequences of Iodine Deficiency Disorders

Iodine is a necessary part of the human diet that can lead to diseases both at levels that are inadequate or in excess. The thyroid gland uses iodine to produce thyroid hormones; thus, many adverse effects of inadequate iodine intake result in thyroid-related disease. Since thyroid hormones are vital for many body functions, abnormal production negatively impacts numerous organs. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and cancer are the most common effects of abnormal iodine levels. Brain development is also commonly affected, particularly during fetal, neonatal, and child development. Environmental and dietary factors impact iodine status, including soil iodine content, pesticide usage, and whether salt iodization is common. This article discusses the sources and serious consequences of iodine deficiency disorders, the benefits of iodine intake, and the adverse effects of excess iodine consumption.

By
Edward F. Group

Diet Analysis - The Mediterranean Diet Adherence Score and Its Importance in Maintenance of Health

We live in an era of widely spread dietary recommendations which, for most part, are overwhelming and confusing for the layperson. Internet searches point to millions of diet-plan results, which leave the consumer in doubt of the best science-based advice or which is merely a business enterprise. An overwhelming number of articles and publications on dietary approaches is found in a simple search on the internet. On a Google search for “diet approach” yield 682,000,000 results in 52 seconds1. While almost all weight-loss and diet plans will cause a person to lose weight temporarily, the most effective diet is the one the person can follow for the rest of their lives, has significantly high adherence scores and is most efficient in weight loss, de-inflammatory properties and health maintenance. It is the type that physiologically works the best for that person in particular, considering the person’s overall health condition, age and gender, and even specific medical conditions. With that in mind, when assessing a dietary plan, either faddism, food theory or special medical diet, it is important to assess adherence scores and physiological outcomes of the plan in order to have a better understanding of the possible successful rate of the diet. In order to fulfill a healthy individual’s daily needs, a complete diet should also include balanced amounts of all food groups such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and water, as well as lifestyle associated with regular physical activity and proper sleeping patterns. Finally, it is important to take into consideration the expertise and background of the person or specialist recommending the dietary plan in order to shed light into the credibility of the source. With a combination of these tools, it is possible to form an educated opinion regarding a specific dietary plan and make proper recommendations to patients.

By
Lidia Alzate, DC, QME, DACBN

Under Appreciated Issues in the Treatment of Chronic Illness – Low Grade, Chronic Acidosis Combined With Potassium Deficiency – Part II – Origins and Impact of Metabolic Acidosis

“The happiness of most people we know is not ruined by great catastrophes or fatal errors, but by the repetition of slowly destructive little things.” Ernest Dimnet, French priest, lecturer and author (1866-1954)

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

Selected Bloodwork and NMR Advanced Lipid Test to Assess CVD Risk and Establish Natural Lipid Lowering Cardioprotective Therapy: A Case Report of a 77-yo female

This is a case study of minimally elevated LDL hyperlipidemia with no other biomarkers of underlying driving risk of cardiovascular disease. This clinical picture is one of the best outcomes when addressing LDL hyperlipidemia. Successful analysis of the CBC, CMP, Add-on supportive biomarkers B9, B12, iron, ferritin, homocysteine, CRP, Vitamin D, Hb1Ac, and NMR advanced Lipoprofile ruled out insulin resistance, diabetes, and an underlying CVD risk and allowed for an individualized dietary, lifestyle, and supplement treatment strategy; regimen included.

By
Jennifer Gantzer, DC, MS, DACBN, FACN

Diet and Nutrition: The Impact of various “Diets” on Mood and Depression

There have been several systematic reviews and meta-analyses exploring the relationship between nutrition and mental health. A few dietary patterns have been studied and show positive impact on depression. Accumulating research findings confirm that combining antidepressants with various dietary and nutritional changes accelerates the rate of treatment response with few or no safety issues, and improved outcomes.

By
Sumithra Nadarajah, MBBS, DACBN

A Look Back on Probiotics in Clinical Practice An Overview

The public’s interest in “Probiotics” has grown at a rapid pace, reflecting professional research and commercial interests in the topic. There were 20,315 papers as of February 11, 2019 indexed to the term “probiotic.” Prior to 2001 there were only 760 papers so indexed.1Articles abound not only in professional journals but also in health magazines and other materials aimed at marketing probiotic products.

By
Paul A. Goldberg, BA, BS, MPH, DC, DACBN, DCBCN

Dietary Recommendations for Preventing Age-Related Muscle Loss in Sarcopenia: A Review

The objective of this review is to determine whether nutritional recommendations can help prevent or prolong sarcopenia.

By
Michael J. Gontarek, DC, MS and Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MPH, MS, DACBN, FACN, CISSN, CSCS

Under Appreciated Issues in the Treatment of Chronic Illness – Low Grade, Chronic Acidosis Combined With Potassium Deficiency – Part I

As we all know, it has become increasingly evident over the last few years that, more than any one single factor, the metabolic foundation of virtually every chronic illness chief complaint is chronic inflammation. Some compelling research is now making it clear that there is an intimate relationship between inflammation and metabolic acidosis.To introduce this concept, consider the following quote from the paper “Relationship between acid-base status and inflammation in the critically ill” by Zampieri et al:

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

The Role of a Mediterranean Diet in the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The purpose of this review is to analyze the role of a Mediterranean diet in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The components of a Mediterranean diet and their effects on insulin sensitivity and glycemic control will be explored. Considerations for use of this diet in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus will be based off improvement of glycemic control, biomarkers specific to increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and insulin sensitivity.

By
Michael J. Gontarek, DC, MS Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MS, DACBN, FACN, CISSN, CSCS

COVID-19 Vaccines: An Opportunity for Critical Thinking and Empowerment

The COVID-19 Pandemic has brought enormous challenge, heightened uncertainties, loss of health and/or life, and strong emotions across the globe. In the midst of this, everyone is faced with questions and choices of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. As clinicians, we must grapple with these same things, as we help our patients and clients with their questions. In the text below, helpful and essential information from the CDC and NIH on the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are presented. Viewpoints and vital information from researchers who have raised questions on the vaccines with their own clinical thinking and expertise are also included. Lastly, a discussion about inflammaging and patient total body burden in regards to illness and vaccination tolerance is presented. No matter what your personal decision is on whether to take the vaccine(s) or not, this is an opportunity to encourage critical thinking and empower one towards healthy choices as we face uncertain times.

By
Linda J. Dobberstein, DC, DACBN, DCBCN

Clinical Case Study on Orally Administered Whey Protein Microencapsulated DIM in Castrate-resistant Metastatic Prostate

3,3′-Diindolylmethane (DIM), an active constituent of cruciferous vegetables and well regarded as a potent anticancer compound as well as an anti-androgen, modulates estrogen metabolism and down-regulates androgen receptors. It has been found to improve Quality of Life (QOL) in prostate cancer patients. Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most commonly detected malignancy among males in developed countries, accounting for 10% of all cancers in 2020, which represents 191,000 new cases. Because of the high prevalence, a randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blind design study was conducted with two parallel groups to determine the effect of the microencapsulated, enhanced orally administered DIM. This novel delivery system of this potent anticancer agent was found to improve the Quality of Life (QOL) of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Among 20 patients, two parallel groups of 10 each, ages ranging from 60-71, histologically confirmed castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) were selected for this 6 week study. Patients within group I (cases) were prescribed whey protein microencapsulated DIM at a dose of 150 mg orally twice daily; group II (control) were administered a dose of 150 mg whey protein (placebo) twice daily. All the patients' Quality of Life (QOL) measurements, using EORTC QLQ-PR25 questionnaire, were determined before and after the study. Results indicated that a significant decrease ( P < 0.05) in the symptoms scale over the 6 week duration was observed in the urinary and hormonal-treatment-related symptoms of the group I (cases) after the active therapy as compared to group II (control). Additionally, a significant improvement over that time frame was observed in the sexual activity in the patients after the treatment; No significant adverse effects were reported by the patients during follow-up visits. Based on this clinical data, it is concluded that the whey protein encapsulated DIM may have the potential to delay the decline of Quality of Life (QOL) and, in some cases, even improve the Quality of Life in those patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

By
Adam Killpartrick, Abbas Khan, Imran Khan, Murad Zeb, Cuina Wang, and MingruoGuo

Natural Interventions To Treat Sleep Deprivation As A Risk Factor For Coronary Heart Disease. A Commentary on the Available Research

According to the World Health Organization ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death in the world. This commentary will discuss natural remedies for insomnia which is a risk factor for coronary heart disease.

By
Adrian Isaza, PhD, MBBS

A Metabolic Point of View on Parkinson’s Disease

In my newsletter series on inflammation, insulin resistance, and neurologic illness, while many neurodegenerative ailments were addressed, certainly the primary focus was Alzheimer’s disease. Others, such as Parkinson’s disease, were addressed, but not in nearly as much detail. In particular, given the incidence of Parkinson’s disease in the US, I feel it warrants more attention. Therefore, I was pleased to find a paper that addresses this ailment from a metabolic, allostatic load point of view, the recently published paper (February 2018) “Aging and Parkinson’s disease: Inflammaging, neuroinflammation and biological remodeling as key factors in pathogenesis” by Calabrese et al. The first quote I would like to feature from this paper discusses the significant frequency of Parkinson’s disease (PD):

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

The Effect of Low Carbohydrate Diets on Glycemia Control, Obesity, and Dyslipidemia in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. Nutritional therapy is an essential part in managing T2DM and often a high-carbohydrate low-calorie diet is advised. Some clinicians and researchers recommend low-carbohydrate diets (LCDs) as the first-line therapy in managing T2DM but this dietary approach is controversial. The aim of this article is to clarify the evidence of the effect of LCDs on glycemic control, weight loss, and blood lipids biomarkers in T2DM patients based on recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs).

By
Abubakar Bawazir, DCN, DACBN, MSc, MS, CNS, CKNS Vinod Patel, MD, FRCP, FHEA, MRCGP, DRCOG

Vitamin D: An Updated Clinical Perspective

Alarming statistics have been emphasized through research findings and the media concerning a global crisis of vitamin D deficiency. Severe vitamin D deficiency is clinically defined as 25(OH)D <30 nmol/L (or 12 ng/mL). Prevalence rates in the United States of a severe vitamin D deficiency have been reported as 5.9%, 7.4% in Canada, and 13% in Europe. Prevalence of 25(OH)D levels <50 nmol/L (or 20 ng/mL) have been estimated to be 24% in the United States, 37% in Canada, and 40% in Europe. These numbers could be a reflection of the dramatic increase in vitamin D testing, large variability in mean serum 25(OH)D which can vary up to 300%, analytic procedures utilized to determine 25(OH)D, or even variable among the available assays. For example, there was more than a 50-fold increase in the incidence of testing for vitamin D deficiency in UK primary care between 2005 and 2015.12 Other countries have also demonstrated a substantial increase in vitamin D testing. In light of this, The Endocrine Society has published clinical guidelines on testing for vitamin D deficiency. Only those at risk for developing a vitamin D deficiency are recommended to be tested, and population screening or screening those not at risk is contraindicated. Regardless of which factors might be contributing to a vitamin D deficiency, most of the population is in fact, not deficient in vitamin D. Current data indicates that serum 25(OH)D levels in the general United States population have increased over the last decade (2007-2017). Public health campaigns increasing awareness, expanded testing, association with diseases, and roles beyond bone health have played important roles in reversing this trend. This presents an important opportunity to revisit vitamin D.

By
Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MS, DACBN, FACN, CISSN, CSCS

A Perspective on “Burn-Out” (Adrenocortical Hypfunction) – Part X – A Unified Hypothesis Linking Cortisol and Dopamine

IT IS BOTH INTERESTING AND GRATIFYING to note that over the space of time that I have been writing this series, it has become apparent that many clinicians, authors, and lecturers are becoming increasingly aware that the issue of stress is much more than finding ways to lower elevated cortisol, as we seem to have concluded so boldly in the 1990s. Now it is becoming routine to consider in chronically stressed patients the equally important issue of catecholamine function where, as with cortisol, both hyper- and hypofunction can contribute to many of the most common and most challenging clinical issues we face today. Furthermore, serotonin is now beginning to receive wide recognition as not just a neurohormone that is linked with depression but as an important component of stress physiology that must often receive just as much attention as cortisol and catecholamines when attempting to optimize the health of so many of today’s chronically ill patients.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

The Gut Microflora-Brain Connection and Neurologic Disorders – A Review of the Evidence – Part II More On The Relationship Between Gut Microflora and Neurological Disorders

Part I of this series ended with a discussion on the relationship between gut microflora and neurological disorders as outlined in the paper “Microbiota-gut-brain axis and the central nervous system” by Zhu et al. Now in part II I would like to continue this discussion by highlighting a quote from the Zhu et al paper on the neurodegenerative disease multiple sclerosis (MS). As you will see, MS is associated with several gut microflora imbalances:

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

A Systems Approach to Brain Degeneration Part 4 – Active Care Strategies

Brain degeneration and neurodegeneration are driven primarily by the immunoinflammatory response and many factors drive this response. We can’t change your DNA. DNA is your genetic blueprint and lifestyle choices can do nothing to change that blueprint. However, the field of epigenetics has shown that you do have the ability, based on your lifestyle choices to create an environment that can either stimulate or inhibit the genetic expression of your risk factors. Healthy living can not only reduce the severity of health issues, it can also be instrumental in reversing them as well.

By
Bradley Kobsar, DC, DACBN, CFMP

Effects of Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) on the Growth and Development of Adolescent Wrestlers: A Clinical Review

Relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S) is a result of low energy availability due to an increase in intensity of exercise accompanied with low caloric intake. RED-S has become an increasingly common diagnosis for many athletes, especially athletes who practice weight restrictive measures for competition. This condition is seen in sports such as gymnastics, weightlifting, and wrestling. Research has examined the effects of low energy availability (EA) on the growth of adolescent athletes by examining body composition, serum biomarkers, and athletic performance. The current literature on wrestlers shows that these athletes have hormone resistance, a decrease in free fat mass, and a decrease in performance when experiencing low EA during the competitive season. Little research on the effects of RED-S exists for wrestlers; however, it is hypothesized that there are negative effects on the growth of wrestlers while competing in their season of play.

By
Drew Sams, CES, CNC and James Geiselman, DC, MS, DACBN, CCSP, ICSC, CES, CNC, NREMT, EMT-P

Case History

CASE HISTORY PT #1: • 62 years old white male presents with 30+ years of severe health complaints. • Welder

By
George H. Postlethwaite, DC

Decreasing Inflammation by Improving Mitochondrial Function

Mitochondrial functions are mainly attributed to regulation of cell proliferation, ATP synthesis, cell death, and metabolism. However, recent scientific advances reveal that mitochondria also play a central role in pro inflammatory signaling, serving as a central platform for control of innate immunity and the inflammatory response. Consequently, mitochondrial dysfunctions have been related to severe chronic inflammatory disorders. Mitochondrial dysfunction can be characterized by a loss of efficiency in the electron transport chain and reductions in the synthesis of high-energy molecules, such as adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) seen in aging and chronic diseases. These diseases include neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich’s ataxia; diabetes and metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and other heart and vascular conditions; gastrointestinal disorders; autoimmune conditions, such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and systemic lupus erythematosus; neurobehavioral and psychiatric diseases, such as autism spectrum disorders, bipolar and mood disorders, and schizophrenia; chronic fatigue syndrome and Gulf War illnesses; musculoskeletal diseases, such as skeletal muscle hypertrophy/atrophy and fibromyalgia; cancer; and chronic infections.

By
Bethany A. Aponte, DC, DACBN, CFMP

Natural Interventions for Migraine Headaches, A View Point on the Available Evidence

IN 2009, A LITERATURE REVIEW OF PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL STUDIES of any type on food triggers, vitamins, supplements, and migraine headaches was performed. This study found that the identification of food triggers, with the help of food diaries, is an inexpensive way to reduce migraine headaches. Finally, the authors recommend the use of the following supplements in the preventative treatment of migraines, in decreasing order of preference: magnesium, petasites hybridus, feverfew, coenzyme Q10, riboflavin, and alpha lipoic acid.

By
Adrian Isaza, PhD, DC, DACBN, DABCI, CCAP

The Atherogenic Dyslipidemia of Metabolic Syndrome: An Update on the Role of Niacin

LIPIDS OCCUPY A DISTINGUISHED PLACE as a modifiable vascular risk factor. Over the last 40 years, in countries where a significant reduction in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) was found the primary contributions came from reductions in lipids, blood pressure, and smoking rates. Both total cholesterol (TC) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) are considered “the most important independent predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.”

By
Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MS, CSCS, DACBN

A Systems Approach To Brain Degeneration Part 2 – Macronutrients, Whole Foods, Micronutrients, Medicinal Plants, Nutraceuticals and Gut Health

THE BRAIN IS THIRD MOST NUTRIENT-AND ENERGY-DEPENDENT ORGAN IN THE BODY, behind only the heart and the kidneys. It is also the most defenseless organ in the body against chemical and emotional toxins, pathogens and emotional and physical trauma. Adequate nutrition plays an important role in the maintenance, treatment and prevention of age-associated brain degeneration (AABD). Malnutrition is amongst the risk factors associated with developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have associated deficiencies in some nutrients with a higher risk of cognitive dysfunction and/or AD.When it comes to brain function, the good news about dietary supplements is running neck-and-neck with that related to exercise.2, 3, 4, 5 Cognitive decline inAABD is correlated with synaptic loss; many of the components required to maintain optimal synaptic function are derived from dietary sources. As synapses are part of the neuronal membrane and are continuously being remodeled, sufficient nutrient building blocks (i.e. uridinemonophosphate, choline and omega-3 fatty acids) are necessary to make the phospholipids required to minimize synaptic degeneration. In addition, B vitamins, phospholipids and other micronutrients act as cofactors or precursors and are required to make neural cell membranes and synapses.While single supplements may have benefits, a multi-target approach using combinations of (micro)nutrients benefits cognitive function in AABD. This paper is a review of the evidence regarding supplementation. While diet and supplements are a good treatment approach, systemic dysregulation can still occur if metabolic challenges are not addressed. The most recent research reveals how these natural supplements are revolutionizing brain health support.

By
Bradley Kobsar, DC, DACBN, CFMP

Are Chronic Inflammation and Its Metabolic Counterpart, Insulin Resistance, the Common Denominators for All Chronic Behavior and Neurodegenerative Disorders? A Review of the Evidence – Part VI

Depression – Does Research That Downplays the Kynurenine Pathway Connection in Fact Reflect Suboptimal Nutrient Status? Much of part V of this series focused on research which provided strong support for the hypothesis that chronic inflammation creates depression via alterations in tryptophan metabolism that redirect tryptophan away from serotonin and melatonin production and towards the kynurenine pathway and neuroexcitatory and neurodestructive metabolites such as quinolinic acid that are products of this pathway. However, while the body of research supporting this connection is immense, it is not unanimous. What follows next is a review of some of the research that downplays the idea that disturbances in tryptophan metabolism that lead to upregulation of the kynurenine pathway have a significant relationship to depression. After that I will review some fascinating research that suggests the papers arguing against the depression/kynurenine pathway connection are flawed because of a variable that was not controlled for in the populations studied, nutritional status. As you will see, nutritional status, in fact, has a massive impact on both kynurenine metabolism and clinical depression.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

A Whole Systems Approach To Prevent Cancer

MANY STUDIES HAVE IDENTIFIED THE LINK BETWEEN DIET AND CANCER. While certain foods can contribute to specific kinds of cancer, some can help to reduce the risk of cancer. There is strong evidence that suggests that nutritional interventions can play a major role in coping with and treating cancer risk. Research has predicted that there would be a 57% surge in cancer cases in the next decades all around the world. This study suggested it is essential to make a shift towards establishing preventive dietary measures to reduce the cancer risk.

By
Gel Clerjuste, DNM, MS, CNS, CFMP

The Anti-Inflammatory Diet: What To Consider

ACUTE INFLAMMATION IS THE CORNER STONE of many ailments that brings a patient to a chiropractor, but there is also chronic inflammation, which is the root cause of most age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and dementia. Many patients seeing a chiropractor have both acute and chronic inflammation. Being overweight or obese causes the body to release inflammatory compounds, which do not subside until weight loss occurs, even with concomitant dietary manipulations. To control inflammation weight loss needs to occur first, followed by consumption of an anti-inflammatory diet. Amelioration of chronic inflammation requires a dietary pattern that reduces excess body fat and contains anti-inflammatory foods. A prudent, nutrient-dense, whole-foods diet satisfies both criteria. Numerous anti-inflammatory dietary approaches are available, but all are not science-based. It is difficult enough for patients to adopt any new dietary change, so imposing those that have no effect, seems pointless. The purpose of this review is to provide evidence-based information about dietary patterns, foods, and specific nutrients that promote weight loss and lower chronic inflammation. Included is a simple rating system to determine the inflammatory impact of a food or meal. Adopting an anti-inflammatory diet will promote weight loss and reduce systemic chronic inflammation.

By
Stacey J. Bell, D.Sc., RDN Ronald P Bouffard, BS, DC, DABCI, DACBN Vasuki Wijendran, PhD, RDN, LDN Kate Bauer, RDN, LDN Charles Marsland, MS

Is Your Daughter At Risk… of Earlier Puberty and Later Breast Cancer? Reproductive Milestones Are Under Assault

MOTHER NATURE HARD-WIRED HUMANITY with specific milestones of reproduction. This means that for millennia the entire human race has had very specific times during specific years when women can start making babies or stop making babies.

By
Devaki Lindsey Berkson, MA, DC, CNS, DACBN

Can Consuming Gluten After Exercise Affect Recovery?

THIS LITERATURE REVIEW HIGHLIGHTS recent research on the relationship between gluten and exercise recovery. Studies have shown that gluten causes an elevation in cytokine activity in certain population samples and various individuals. Prolonged elevations in cytokines, can shift the balance of cytokine activity from anti- inflammatory to pro-inflammatory. This shift causes a mimicking of a catabolic or chronic inflammatory state. In the post exercise state, there is an elevation of cytokine activity that helps promote healing. There is a fine line between recovery from tissue breakdown and the tissue breakdown from the catabolic state induced by chronic inflammation.

By
Benjamin L. Bradshaw, BS, DC, DABCI, DACBN, CGP

Dietary Supplements for Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis as an Alternative to NSAIDs. View Point on the Available Research

A RECENT OFFICIAL PUBLICATION of the College of Family Physicians of Canada, Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors and traditional NSAIDs except naproxen increase the risk of serious cardiovascular events and death. When prescribing NSAIDs, patients’ gastrointestinal (GI) and cardiovascular risks should be assessed, with naproxen or low-dose ibuprofen preferentially chosen for patients at risk of CV disease.

By
Adrian Isaza PhD, DC, MS

Are Chronic Inflammation and Its Metabolic Counterpart, Insulin Resistance, the Common Denominators for All Chronic Behavior and Neurodegenerative Disorders? A Review of the Evidence – Part V

Depression – More Information to Support the Idea That It Is Truly an Inflammatory Illness As you might imagine, despite the large volume of research supporting the idea that depression is an inflammatory illness, many in both the clinical and academic communities will point to various manifestations and subtleties of the average case of depression as evidence that, for this patient, the depression can’t be inflammatory. Therefore, in this installment I would like to address some of these qualifiers used by the naysayers to support their belief that depression can’t be an inflammatory illness and present evidence that, almost invariably, these qualifiers have an inflammatory basis.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

Herbal Products for the Treatment of Chronic Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease is an ever-present diagnosis that is becoming more and more common in the United States. Each year, approximately 30,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported to CDC by state health departments and the District of Columbia. However, this number does not reflect every case of Lyme disease that is diagnosed in the United States every year. Standard national surveillance is only one way that public health officials can track where a disease is occurring and with what frequency. Recent estimates using other methods suggest that approximately 300,000 people may get Lyme disease each year in the United States. Its occurrence was considered only limited to the geographic region of the Northeast, but current data from the CDC demonstrates that it has been detected in every state except for Hawaii. Current treatment protocols are limited to acute antibiotic therapies and treatment for symptoms (pain, inflammation, depression, fatigue) with minimal result. There is an increasing pool of evidence that herbal/botanical intervention may prove to be a better treatment solution with better long-term outcomes.

By
Ronald P. Bouffard, B.S, D.C, DABCI, DACBN

Relationship Between Nutrition Knowledge and Body Mass Index

THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY was to determine the relationship between nutrition knowledge and body mass index (BMI) in a chiropractic student population.

By
Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MS, DACBN, CSCS Marc Lucente, DC, DACO

Select Essential (Water and Fat)-soluble Vitamins — Epigenetic and Synergistic Co-dependent Roles

Essential vitamins include the water-soluble B-vitamins, water-soluble Vitamins C, and fat-soluble Vitamins A , D, E, K and represent a diverse group of required dietary constituents our body’s can no longer intrinsically synthesize de novo and mandate dietary and/or supplemental in-take. Marginal or subclinical deficiencies of essential vitamins has been recently acknowledged by the US government as having negative impacts on health. This addresses the “other” not-so-well-known roles of selected essential vitamins including epigenetic post-translational modifications and their synergistic co-dependent relationships with other essential vitamins to optimize biochemical function.

By
Dr. Jen Gantzer, DC, DACBN

Nutrition Knowledge in a Chiropractic Student Population

The aim of the study was to describe the level of nutrition knowledge in students undertaking an accredited Doctor of Chiropractic program prior to receiving instruction on nutrition within the curriculum.

By
Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MS, CSCS, DACBN

A Practical Approach to the Treatment of PET Scan Identified Cancers

In 2017, the American Cancer Society accounted over 1.5 million new cases of cancer and over half a million cancer-related deaths in the U.S. alone. These statistics expose two facts: first, the current standards of medicine offer very little help in directing the public towards effective cancer prevention, and second, the likelihood of survival provided by the current standards are grim.

By
Shamim Matin, DC, DACBN, CIHP

Microgreens: Nature’s Supplement

Microgreens have been used for many decades as a culinary treat or improve the presentation of gastronomic delights. Recent studies have demonstrated microgreens possess a highly nutritious profile in the category of a super food. This paper intends to introduce microgreens and their nutritional benefits to the diet.

By
Daniel Czelatdko, DC, CCSP, DACBN

Using the Mediterranean Diet for the Prevention and Intervention of the Main Causes of Death as well as the Prevention of Neurodegenerative Disease.

Gaining and maintaining health is something that all people strive to achieve. With many scientific revelations about the health of the human body and many new and interesting ways to preserve health popping up in the market place there are old ways that are being revealed by new scientific evidence that may hold keys unpracticed by today’s society. The Mediterranean diet (MD), a dietary and lifestyle pattern based around the Mediterranean basin, has been practiced for hundreds of years and its people that adhere to that pattern are statistically healthier than those people of western origin. It is on this premise that the MD should be considered as a clinical intervention for the main causes of death in the western world and a preventive measure for the same ailments.

By
Donald C. Thompson II, DC, CFMP, DACBN

The Endogenous Cannabinoid System: A Neuro Modulatory Role

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is one of the most important physiological systems due to its multidimensional role in many different physiological functions, from modulating the immune and inflammatory response, and maintenance of homeostatic balance, to neuroprotection and regulation of nociception. The ECS has been termed the cornerstone connecting brain activity with all of the body’s organs. The ECS consists of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous cannabinoids, and the enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of the endocannabinoids. The first documented use of the plant Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is traced back to 5,000 years ago. Extracts of Cannabis were utilized for a wide spectrum of medicinal uses, however it was not until 1964 when researchers Yechiel Gaoni and Raphael Mechoulam discovered and isolated the plant’s first phyto cannabinoid - a psychoactive component called tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Soon thereafter cannabidiol (CBD), another phyto cannabinoid was isolated. Although this vast molecular signaling system was named after the plant (Cannabis sativa) that these “discoveries” were made in, the human body already possessed this physiological system endogenously. Consequently, it was the discovery of exogenous cannabinoids which successfully lead to embarking on the existence of the endogenous cannabinoids (and system).

By
Louis Miller, DC, MS, DACBN Douglas Shapiro, Medical Student, Derek Weissner, Medical Journalist

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is commonly seen in clinical practice and is easily prevented and cured by making simple dietary and lifestyle changes. Up until fairly recently, heartburn wasn’t taken too seriously. But we now know that heartburn and GERD can have serious and even life threatening complications including scarring, constriction, ulceration, and ultimately cancer of the esophagus.

By
Brian West, DC, MS, DACBN

Natural Interventions for Dysmenorrhea as an Alternative to NSAIDS. Commentary on the Available Research

A recent systematic review and meta-analysis involving over 400,000 individuals found that all NSAIDs, including naproxen, were found to be associated with an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction.

By
Adrian Isaza, DC, DACBN, CCAP

Are Chronic Inflammation and Its Metabolic Counterpart, Insulin Resistance, the Common Denominators for All Chronic Behavior and Neurodegenerative Disorders? A Review of the Evidence – Part IV

Depression – Is It Truly an Inflammatory Illness? Of all the behavioral and neurodegenerative disorders considered so far in this series, there is no question that, from a clinical standpoint, the one that seems to be most prevalent and, judging from the use of SSRIs in this country, generating the most concern, is depression. Of course, depression as a clinical concern among both allopathic and alternative practitioners is nothing new. Allopaths, as noted above, have been dealing with depression with highly variable levels of success for years, mainly with SSRIs. Unfortunately, studies continue to be published, one as recently as the time of the writing of this newsletter (June 8, 2016), increasingly questioning the efficacy of SSRIs. In “Comparative efficacy and tolerability of antidepressants for major depressive disorder in children and adolescents: a network meta-analysis” by Cipriani et al1 the authors state:

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

The Prostate: A review of lower urinary tract symptoms and popular nutritional supplements used for better prostate health and cancer.

This paper will overview lower urinary tract symptoms that commonly prompt a man to seek help from his physician. It will also discuss four popular nutritional foods that are garnering interest for prostate health and cancer treatment from the scientific community.

By
John D. Ratcliffe, DC, DACRB, DACBN

Melatonin Deficiency Versus Delayed Secretion

There has been a lot of interest in the literature about the neuroprotective characteristics of melatonin, such as the ability of melatonin to reduce pyramidal neuronal death in the hippocampus, and this paper provides some insights and clinical approaches to manage two physiologically deficient states of melatonin secretion: overt melatonin deficiency versus Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome (DSPS).

By
Joseph Esposito, DC, CCN, CNS, DABCN, CTN, CCSP and Irene Carlson

Hypertension – Part 2

Dietary and supplemental lipid intake is a particularly well-studied facet in its relationship to HT. The three most studied aspects of lipids within HT include fatty fish/supplemental fish oil, the ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, and the role of omega-9 fatty acids. One of the common recommendations seen by most is an increase in fatty fish (mackerel, herring, sardines, tuna, salmon) intake as a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids which typically contain at least 1 gram per serving (usually higher) of combined EPA and DHA. A diet that includes fatty fish at least 3 times a week can lower blood pressure but the magnitude of the reduction is small. This reduction is most pronounced in pre-hypertensive individuals indicating that many could achieve a normal blood pressure from simply improving dietary habits.

By
Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MS, CSCS, DACBN

Understanding Adrenal Fatigue: Nutritional and lifestyle strategies to effectively restore proper adrenal function

The human body will respond to many forms of stress with various complex mechanisms. One of these mechanisms is through the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis). The end result of this process is increased cortisol production and secretion by the adrenal glands. However, with the situation of continual chronic stress the adrenal glands become overwhelmed with the demand to manage the stress eventually leading to a condition termed adrenal fatigue. The adrenal glands become unable to properly respond to stress and therefore unable to produce and secrete cortisol. Adrenal fatigue is most often associated with low cortisol, postural hypotension and many other specific signs and symptoms. Testing of low cortisol to determine the possibility of adrenal fatigue, can be accurately measured with saliva cortisol testing multiple times throughout the day. There are multiple strategies for managing adrenal fatigue found to be effective through previous research. These include nutritional strategies of; Vitamins C, B1, B5 and E, magnesium, zinc, adrenal glandular, ashwagandha, panax ginseng, and licorice. There are also lifestyle strategies of; stress management, dietary modifications, proper exercise, reducing caffeine and proper sleep.

By
Bob Kariatsumari, BSc, DC

Why Are We Sick?

Disease is thought to be a pathological process, such as schizophrenia, throat infection, etc. The degree of deviation from a biological norm is the factor used to quantify a disease. Another similar term, illness, is thought to be an unhealthy feeling that is internally rooted in a patient. Sickness is the external expression of a state of unhealthiness. It can be chronic or acute – the latter being more serious. It is considered to be a societal recognition of an illness. If your illness is recognized by the society you live in, it will be considered sufficiently important for sickness benefits, such as excusing absenteeism, reimbursement for treatment expenses, etc.

By
Gel Clerjuste, DNM, CFMP

Case History Corner

Applying Nutrients for Kreb’s Cycle and Methylation Pathways Using Genetic Testing and Applied Kinesiology- A Case Study (The patient’s name has been changed, yet her permission for the case history was obtained)

By
Valorie J. Prahl, DC, DACBN

Are Chronic Inflammation and Its Metabolic Counterpart, Insulin Resistance, the Common Denominators for All Chronic Behavior and Neurodegenerative Disorders? A Review of the Evidence – Part III

The Complicated Relationship Between Antidepressant Medication and Inflammation Assuming that inflammation plays an important role in all neurodegenerative and mood disorders, as I suggested in the first two installments of this series, another important question must be asked. Even though, as I will discuss, efficacy of antidepressant medication is highly variable with depression, when it is effective could the reason be an impact on inflammation as opposed to the generally accepted mechanism of optimization of neurotransmitter activity, principally serotonin? If this is true, it would certainly provide powerful proof that inflammation is as much of a cause of depression as is neurotransmitter imbalance, and maybe more so. However, even if antidepressants are not proven to have an anti-inflammatory effect, this does not conclusively document that inflammation has no role in depression. Why? Given the fact, as I mentioned above, that antidepressants demonstrate poor efficacy so often, the presence of chronic CNS inflammation could also prove why antidepressants are not effective. With this complexity in mind, I would like to examine both sides of this controversy.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

Hypertension – Part 1

Hypertension is an important condition from both a physiological and personal standpoint. While it may be loosely defined as high blood pressure, the impact of this condition warrants much closer scrutiny. Current estimates place almost one third of the United States population as hypertensive. In fact, hypertension (HT) has been referred to as the “…most prevalent chronic condition among older adults”. An important realization early on is that the exact cause of HT remains unknown. All of the current therapies available, whether dietary, supplemental, or pharmacologic are designed for symptomatic control of the primary symptom of HT, high arterial blood pressure. This is an interesting consequence as we are treating the symptom instead of the root cause of the disease.

By
Jeffrey P. Krabbe, DC, MS, CSCS, DACBN

Dietary Triggers of Intestinal Permeability in Type I Diabetes

The incidence of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is steadily increasing in our current population. Onset of T1D is determined by genetic susceptibility and environmental factors that trigger an autoimmune reaction. While it is difficult to determine the exact environmental factors that trigger the autoimmune response in T1D, research has found a strong correlation between the decline in health of the intestinal microbiome and the progression to T1D diagnoses. Research presented in this article suggests that maintenance of a healthy intestinal microbiome through dietary modification and nutritional supplementation can be a safe and effective option for therapeutic intervention of T1D.

By
Wesley S. Ply, DC

Anti-inflammatory and Immune Enhancing Effects Produced by Plant Based Oils (Chia Seed Oil, Black Cumin Oil, and Palm Oil)

Chia (Salvia hispanica L) is a tropical and subtropical climates herbaceas plant from the mint family (Lamiaceae) which produces tiny, flavorless and white or dark brown seeds. Chia seeds have oval shape with approximately 1.9 - 2 mm long, 1 - 1.4 mm wide and 0.8 – 1 mm thickness diameter.1 Chia seed oil is extracted from the seeds and has been shown to be quite effective in producing health benefits ranging from reducing inflammation to fighting cancer.

By
Scott K. Hannen, DC, DABCI, DACBN

Review of Moringa oleifera (Moringaceae)

Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) has been used in traditional herbal medicine to treat a variety of conditions (e.g. diabetes, gout, acute rheumatis) and has been used for its antiseptic, antidiarrheal, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antiulcer, and antibiotic properties. M. oleifera is found in a variety of forms (e.g. pills, powders, etc...), and may be beneficial when treating patients. Though some precautions may be necessary, the nutritional and clinical benefits of this plant may prove beneficial in a patient’s diet. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current literature regarding M. oleifera.

By
James Geiselman, DC, MS, EMT-P, DACBN

Natural Alternatives for Infection

More and more people are turning to non-drug alternatives for many health problems. When it comes to infection treatment, the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant organisms and disruption of the balance between beneficial and harmful bacteria in the body has caused many to look for alternatives to antibiotics. In one report, the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention noted at least 20 strains of resistant bacteria. They noted that 833 prescriptions for antibiotics were written for every 1000 people. According to Dr. Carol Kauffman, upper respiratory infections accounted for up to 70% of all antibiotics given. She went on to say that since most upper respiratory infections were caused by fungi, not bacteria, antibiotics are not even required unless there is a secondary bacterial infection. According to a study in the Journal of The American Medical Association, if certain conditions such as a weakened immune system and other underlying medical conditions are combined with antibiotic use, this can increase certain cancers. When faced with a microbial-based infection, there are several good natural options that can be helpful, but which ones are truly effective? Here are a few options that have merit.

By
Christopher Berry, DC, DACBN, CFMP

The Gut-Brain Axis and Autism

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurological dysfunctions that share certain behavioral and developmental features in common with each other. ASD is an umbrella term that includes Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, Asperger’s disease, and bipolar disorders. The DSM-5 places the child who has ASD into two different behavioral categories. The first is that the child has difficulty in both social interaction and social communication and the second is that the child has repetitive behaviors and repetitive interests. Today, autism is the most prevalent childhood disorders in the world. As of the year 2016, epidemiologists suggest that ASD have a dramatic increase over the past decade and may affect up to two percent of children born.

By
Haley Trombley, DC, MS, DACBN

Nutritional Supplements and PTSD

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is when an individual experiences a traumatic event. PTSD may have been originally been associated with war, acts of war and other major traumatic events. During WWI PTSD was known as “Shell Shock” and “combat fatigue” after WWII. In 1980 PostTraumatic Stress Disorder was officially recognized and given a diagnosis by the American Psychiatric Association, DSM-III. Since 1980 the diagnosis criteria for PTSD has changed and evolved. The American Psychiatric Association revised the PTSD diagnosis code in DSM-III-R (1987), DSM-IV (1994), DSM-IV TR (2000). The first diagnosis code for PTSD stipulates that a person must have experienced a traumatic event which is outside the range of normal human experience. This experience would include traumatic events like war, torture, or rape. It also included natural disasters like earthquakes and hurricanes and man-made disasters such as factory explosions and auto accidents. In the last revision of the diagnosis code by the American Psychiatric Association, it begins to allow for the variable that PTSD cannot be fully objectified because every person will respond and cope with a traumatic experience differently.

By
Chris D. Townsend, DC

Are Chronic Inflammation and Its Metabolic Counterpart, Insulin Resistance, the Common Denominators for All Chronic Behavior and Neurodegenerative Disorders? A Review of the Evidence – Part II

In part I of this series I reviewed the paper “Immune aging, dysmetabolism, and inflammation in neurological diseases” by Deleidi et al in which it was stated that the key cell in the CNS that appears to be most responsible for much of the damage seen in the CNS as the result of chronic inflammation is the main innate immune cell of the brain, microglia. As noted by the authors, chronic inflammation can up-regulate activity of microglia leading to increased CNS inflammation and a whole host of mood, behavioral, and neurodegenerative disorders. In part II of this series I would like to discuss microglia in more detail by reviewing the paper “The role of inflammation and microglial activation in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders” by Reus et al.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

The Importance of Vitamin D in Autoimmune Conditions

Vitamin D is one of the essential nutrients to sustain the human health. As a member of the steroid hormone family, it has a classic role in regulating metabolism of calcium and a non-classic role in affecting cell proliferation and differentiation. Epidemiological studies have shown that 25OHD deficiency is closely associated with common chronic diseases such as bone metabolic disorders, tumors, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. 25OHD deficiency is also a risk factor for neuropsychiatric disorders and autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D immunomodulatory effects are suppression of adaptive immunity through a reduction in the production of interleukin (IL)-2, gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor, inhibition of expression of IL-6, secretion and production of autoantibodies by B lymphocytes, and activation of innate immunity.

By
Jean K. Lawrence, MH, CFMP, ND, NMD, PhD, DACBN

GMOs: Safe or Dangerous?

Genetically Modified Organisms defined as “organisms in which the genetic material (DNA) has been altered in such a way that does not occur naturally.” (GMOs) originated in the 1980s when technological advances made it possible to splice small sections of DNA from one organism to another; an antibiotic resistant tobacco plant was the first successful case. In the 1990’s this plant gene splicing was popular with soybeans in an attempt to make them herbicide resistant. By the year 2000 this procedure expanded with the addition of placing vitamins and minerals into the plant thus nutritionally “enriching” it. For example, a man made combination of genes, including a gene to produce the pesticide Cry1AB protein (commonly known as Bt toxin and originally found in the Bacillus thuringiensis organism), is randomly inserted into the DNA of corn. Critics argue over how scientific this process really is. The scientists using this process believe that it is a precise and exact science; I will leave it up to the reader to decide after I describe how the above insect protected corn plant is engineered. First, some DNA from a bacterial species in the soil, the Bt, is spliced into a viral species, known as the promotor which keeps its insecticide property of the gene turned on 24/7- hoping it will take on the desired effect of total insect resistance. Next, a gun shoots toxins on a plate containing millions of plant cells in hopes of getting these GMO genes into many of them. These are then cloned and used to grow plants that often results in some damage to the DNA, creating even higher levels of the toxin Bt. These scientists assume there are no deleterious consequences to this process that they cannot control and intend to obtain a patent for this engineered plant. Moreover, there is also the assumption that this process can be always be controlled.

By
Martin S. Gildea, DC, CFMP, DACBN

Intravenous Alpha Lipoic Acid as an Alternative to Amphetamine- Related Drugs for the Treatment of Obesity in Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy. A Commentary of the Available Research

Initial amphetamine drugs around the 1950s were discontinued due to safety issues, and only recently these pharmacological agents with acceptable safety profiles have become available in the U.S.

By
Adrian Isaza, DC, DACBN

Ascorbic Acid

Evidence supports the fact that ascorbic acid has beneficial functions in the human body. Supporting the body with adequate levels of this nutrient may provide antioxidant status as well as potentially help fight off disease.

By
Anthony Crifase, DC, CNS, DACBN

Intermittent Fasting and Centralized Adiposity

In the last decade there has been a great deal of attention focusing on the ill effects of centralized excess body fat distribution. This is the over accumulation of deeper fat that surrounds vital organs in your abdomen such as the liver, pancreas and digestive tract. Not to be confused with subcutaneous fat – the superficial fat that lies directly underneath the skin typically located around the thighs, hips, buttocks and stomach, visceral fat increases a plethora of inflammatory bodily compounds called adipokines that contribute many of today’s chronic conditions such as type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, atherosclerosis and certain types of cancer. An easy way to gauge dangerous levels of visceral fat is to measure waist circumference (WC). Males who measure over 40 inches and females who measure over 35 inches around are at increased health risk. This is even seen in people who are at a normal BMI, but carry excess fat centrally. Another simple way to determine an overabundance of visceral fat is to measure the waist to hip ratio (WHR). A WHR less than 0.9 in males and less than 0.85 in females are considered low health risk.

By
Louis Miller, DC, DACBN Co-author - Douglas B. Shapiro, Medical Student

Hormonal Havoc: Alternative Therapies to Hormone Replacement

The research presented in this text shows the dangerous risks that have been found to be associated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and compounded bioidentical hormone therapy (CBHT). The risks associated with each type of hormone replacement are unique and are considered separately. Alternative therapies for menopausal symptoms discussed include diet, exercise, acupuncture, and supplementation. Evidence shows conflicting information regarding the efficacy of most alternative therapies however, it is the author’s belief that the conflicts lie in the research methodology more so than in the individual product’s true efficacy. The safest and most effective way to treat menopausal symptoms will be different for each woman and will involve a multifaceted approach incorporating diet, exercise, supplementation, and possibly acupuncture. Hormone therapies should be saved as a last resort option in difficult and severe cases where the alternative therapies have not provided relief for the patient.

By
Kameron L Bavender

Are Chronic Inflammation and Its Metabolic Counterpart, Insulin Resistance, the Common Denominators for All Chronic Behavior and Neurodegenerative Disorders? A Review of the Evidence – Part I

In the late 90s and early 2000s I became quite interested in mood and behavioral disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), burn-out, and the anti-social behavior that happened at Columbine High School and many other locations, as we have seen all too often since. At that time my focus was research on stress endocrinology (cortisol, etc.), toxicology, and diet. However, as compelling as all this research was, I had a lingering feeling that there was much more to these neurologic disorders than just diet, toxicology, and psychological stress. Not just anything, though. It was something big that underlies not only the behavioral disorders mentioned above that I was addressing but virtually all chronic behavioral and neurodegenerative disorders.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

Meat Consumption and Breast Cancer Risk

In many parts of the world, meat consumption makes up a big portion of a typical diet, particularly in the U.S. and other developed countries. Although meat is an important source of protein, iron, minerals, vitamins and fats, some components of meat, such as saturated fats and cholesterol can contribute to negative health consequences. Researchers are currently investigating whether there are any negative impacts linking meat consumption with breast cancer risk.

By
Lien A. Diep, DC, LAc, DABCI, DACBN

The Physiological Response to Dysbiosis Impacting the Immune, Endocrine and Nervous Systems

The gastrointestinal network encompasses 100 trillion microbes that perform countless vital roles for the human body. These microbes impact the functioning of the endocrine, immune, and nervous systems. The gut releases several hormones, neurotransmitters, and cytokines based upon the stimuli from the enteric nervous system as well as nutrients that enter the gut. Factors surrounding development, such as: breast feeding vs formula, vaginal vs cesarean section delivery, and intrauterine or infant antibiotic use also play a role in the development and homeostasis of the microbiome. Several triggers within our environment contribute to the stress placed on the homeostasis of our microbiome. Psychological, traumatic, hormonal, environmental, physical, chemical and infectious stressors disrupt the natural balance within the microbiome. This often results in impaired gut barrier function, leading to increased permeation of toxins and inflammatory cytokines into systemic circulation. As these inflammatory mediators enter circulation, they can impair the other barrier systems within the body, such as the blood brain barrier, impacting cognitive function.

By
Amber Horsley, DC

Alzheimer’s Disease

Introduction and Clinical Presentation: A 68-year-old female presents to the office accompanied by her daughter. The daughter states that her mother has been healthy most of her life, except for history of diabetes mellitus type 2 controlled by medication. However, recently her mother has been demonstrating signs of memory loss, language difficulty, and unpredictable behavior. She states that her mother was found wondering on the streets twice in the last month. The mother seems to forget that she just had meals and claims she had not had her medication when she actually just took it. Her mother has always been able to pay her bills on time, but recently she seems to forget to send in payments. Her mother seems to repeat herself over and over and apparently gets upset easily over previously non-stressful situations, such as misplacing a book or the keys. Because the mother lives alone, the daughter is concern about the safety of her mother.

By
Lidia Alzate, DC, DACBN

A Systems Approach to Brain Degeneration

“Aging of the world’s population is leading to a substantial increase in the numbers of individuals with sequelae of diseases and injuries. Rates of years lived with disability are declining much more slowly than mortality rates. The non-fatal dimensions of disease and injury will require more and more attention from health systems.” The most common neurodegenerative disorder is aging. With increasing life expectancy of the population, the number of elderly person’s increases in industrialized societies and healthcare providers will increasingly be confronted with age-related changes in the brain. In America, the long anticipated Baby Boomer surge started in 2011 when the first of that generation turned 65. The estimated escalation of 71 million more to reach 65 by 2030 presents a range of concerns for health conditions including “age associated brain degeneration” (AABD). Why does all of this matter? Because many people have, or will, experience AABD down the road and many more people will have to watch or care for someone that loses their quality of life. The entire population will have to bear the societal cost of AABD. For example, dementia has been growing steadily for years, and the 2010 figure of dementia is between $157 and $215 billion. Whatever the number of cases is today, it’s about to explode because the Baby Boomers are in their golden years so sooner or later, AABD is likely to come your way. However, there are things that can be done about it now such as; determining if you have it, discovering why you have it and learning what to do about it.

By
Bradley Kobsar, DC, DACBN, CFMP

Some Thoughts On Sudden Cardiac Death – Part VI

Part V of this series ended with a promise that I would be discussing research on the important and intimate relationship between potassium and magnesium metabolism. In particular, because magnesium plays a major role in the transport of potassium into the intracellular compartment, magnesium deficiency can largely negate the potentially positive effects of any dietary or supplemental potassium protocol. Therefore, evaluation of magnesium status should be a top priority whenever need for potassium is being considered.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

The Ketogenic Diet for Neurological and Epileptic Conditions

In the past decade, there has been a lot of interest in low carbohydrate eating mainly as a diet plan for losing weight. Many think of the famed Atkins diet (1972) named for cardiologist Dr. Robert C. Atkins who popularized low carbohydrate consumption combined with higher protein and fat intake as a way to reduce body fat. However, it was in 1921 that endocrinologist Dr. Rollin Woodyatt and internist Dr. Russell Wilder who initiated that by altering human metabolism to fuel itself on various types of dietary fat resulted in several unique health benefits. Carbohydrate intake is relatively high (55-65% of daily calories) in a typical westernized diet. However ketogenic diet carbohydrate intake is relatively low (5-10% of daily calories). This shift in fuel supply run primarily on fat will prompt the liver to convert fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies (in the form of beta-Hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone) in the blood, a state known as ketosis.

By
Louis Miller, DC, MS, DACBN

Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Pain Management: In Depth

Unrelieved pain is a major global and national healthcare problem. Chronic pain affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined. One hundred million Americans suffer from chronic pain with one out of ten experiencing pain every day for three months or more. In the adult population, one-tenth are diagnosed with chronic pain annually with a median duration of 7 years per episode. There is growing evidence that nutritional interventions and nutraceutical applications have a role in pain management. Omega-3 fatty acids have a strong role in this integrative approach.

By
Valerie Johnson, DC, DABCI, DACBN

Remarkable Citicoline

Citicoline? Don’t you mean acetylcholine? No, it’s spelled correctly – citicoline. How come I have never heard of this before? Well, I thought the same thing when I attended the International Society of Sports Nutrition in 2017 and heard Dr. Renshaw citing his work on the subject. It was interesting that, being a sports nutrition conference, they highlighted a brain supplement not specific to sports performance and something I had never heard of before. After hearing all the incredible claims, my curiosity was piqued, and I decided to do some further research on the subject.

By
Gregory A. Celaya, DC, MS, CNS, DACBN, CISSN

Intravenous Magnesium as an Alternative to Long Acting Beta Agonists in Asthma Patients with Severe Acute Exacerbations. A Commentary on the Available Research

In 2010, Salpeter, et al, conducted a literature review that included 36,588 participants and found that long acting beta-agonists increased catastrophic events 2-fold. The review concluded that long-acting beta-agonists increase the risk for asthma-related intubations and deaths, even when used in a controlled fashion with concomitant inhaled corticosteroids.

By
Adrian Isaza, DC, DACBN

Botanical Medicine in Cancer Prevention and Treatment

“Plants have been used as medicines since the dawn of animal life. The initial use of plants as medicines by humans is thought to have been a result of ‘instinctive’ dowsing. Animals in the wild still provide evidence that this phenomenon occurs. Animals, with a few notable exceptions, eat plants that heal them and avoid plants that do them harm.” “The use of botanicals in oncology is based on the synergistic hypothesis – that combinations of well-selected active constituents form one or more botanical species will together have a synergistic anticancer effect. Some of the ancient Traditional Chinese Medicine combination therapies have been shown to improve efficacy of chemotherapy in pancreatic and colon cancer patients.” Unfortunately, but not surprisingly, the use of whole plants or combination plants constituents has not been pursued by mainstream oncology research (mainly in the U.S.). “Even those who have pursued whole-plant botanical oncology have been stymied by the absence of adequate taxonomic, chemical, and bioassay validation of the natural products used in research.”

By
Wayne Sodano, DC, DABCI, DACBN, CFMP, ND

Some Thoughts On Sudden Cardiac Death – Part V

Part IV of this series ended in the midst of my discussion of clinical conditions that are most associated with hypokalemia. I will continue this discussion shortly. However, after writing part IV, an interesting question was posed by a reader in response to the discussion on foods that are most likely, when consumed in excess, to induce potentially fatal hypokalemic states. Of course, as you saw, those foods are almost always those that have a significant caffeine content. The reader, though, quite understandably, noticed a glaring omission in this discussion – there was no mention of coffee. Therefore, I would like to return to this discussion, focusing on a case report on coffee-induced hypokalemia.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

Case History

PATIENT: VD CHIEF COMPLAINT: Alopecia

By
David A. Wallman, CCN, CCAP, DACBN

A Novel, Multi-Ingredient Supplement to Manage Elevated Blood Lipids in Patients with No Evidence of Cardiovascular Disease: A Pilot Study

Recent changes in usage guidelines have created the potential for millions more Americans to be prescribed statin medications.1 Caution should be advised because the risk of adverse effects of statins may outweigh their benefits and preclude their preventive use for patients without confirmed cardiovascular disease (CVD) who present with elevated blood lipids. However, statins have shown some benefit in primary CVD prevention. Red yeast rice (RYR) is a dietary supplement that has been demonstrated to reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in blood and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been shown to reduce blood levels of triglycerides (TGs).5-13,18 Although effective, quality control issues aggravate risk of Furthermore, low dosages per capsule, which require patients to manage and consume many capsules per day, also may reduce patient compliance to supplementation regimens.

By
Thomas Hobbs, DC, DABCI, DACBN

Perspective on Using Glutathione for a Wide Range of Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndromes

In a clinical setting where nutritional therapies are offered many providers are seeking strategies to support patients in reducing inflammation using lifestyle and nutritional supplementation. Exogenous glutathione and glutathione precursors use appears to be increasing in the clinical setting for various conditions associated with oxidative stress and glutathione depletion.

By
Matthew Lewis, DC

The Ketogenic Diet: A Summary

For more than 2000 years, fasting diets including avoidance and or excess of all types of foods were used for many ailments such as epilepsy. In fact, this diet was the therapy recorded in Hippocrates treatment regimen for epilepsy in the fifth century BC; five hundred years later it is also mentioned in the biblical narrative in which Jesus cures an epileptic boy. Since fasting or simple starvation was too difficult for many patients to comply with, the ketogenic diet developed.

By
Martin Gildea DC, CFMP

Our Genes Do Not Determine Our Health Destiny

When the human genome was decoded at the turn of the new millennium, it was thought this would open new avenues into treating all kinds of diseases. It did that, however, it also made us realize that there were many diseases that were related to the genes we inherited. Even so, our genes don’t determine the state of our health, except if we are studying a single gene disorder, such as Down’s syndrome.

By
Gel Clerjuste, DC

The Risk of Taking Statin Drugs

GATEWAY DRUGS: A drug, such as alcohol or marijuana, whose use is thought to lead to the use of and dependence on more dangerous, addicting substances, such as cocaine, heroin, or nicotine is now considered a “gateway drug,” as it commonly precedes and is combined with other substance use.

By
Dr. David C. Kolbaba

Cushing’s Syndrome

Cushing’s syndrome is a hormonal disorder caused by prolonged exposure of the body’s tissues to high levels of the hormone cortisol. Sometimes called hypercortisolism, Cushing’s syndrome occurs when the body’s tissues are exposed to high levels of cortisol for too long.1Many people develop Cushing’s syndrome because they take glucocorticoids—steroid hormones that are chemically similar to naturally produced cortisol— such as prednisone for asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and other inflammatory diseases. Glucocorticoids are also used to suppress the immune system after transplantation to keep the body from rejecting the new organ or tissue. Other people develop Cushing’s syndrome because their bodies produce too much cortisol.

By
Kristy Clinton, DC, MS Nutr.

Manipulating the Epigenetics of Future Generations

Epigenetic diets and metabolic programming have become popular topics in recent years and research has explored the many exogenous factors that influence the epigenetics and therefore health outcome of the offspring into adulthood. Such factors as environmental exposure to pollutants, nutritional exposures that influence the health of the mother and fetus as well as paternal influences have been investigated. Another interesting topic is the transgenerational effects of these exogenous factors, preserving the epigenetic changes of the phenotype into at least two generations. Much of the research to date has focused on perinatal under-nutrition—such as in times of famine—and the relationship to later developing chronic diseases, however over-nutrition is significantly more prevalent than under-nutrition, and the outcomes of the offspring are very similar. The purpose of this review article is to combine the current thoughts on epigenetic influences during pregnancy and provide practical applications in regards to pre-conceptual and perinatal nutrition in order to optimize the positive metabolic outcome of the offspring of the pregnant woman and minimize the predisposition for developing chronic diseases in adulthood.

By
Natalie Hope

Some Thoughts On Sudden Cardiac Death – Part IV

As you have seen, the central theme in this series has been the under appreciation of sudden depletions of potassium, usually in the serum, and catastrophic illness, specifically heart attack. However, I ended part III with another equally important discussion. If potassium depletion is having such a large impact on acute cardiovascular disorders, why is it so under recognized? My answer, as you saw, was that most in the health care community do not fully understand the physiology of potassium metabolism and how readily serum potassium levels can drop as the result of environmental stressors that are so ubiquitous and such an integral part of the everyday lifestyles of so many Americans that they are rarely recognized as stressors that can have a catastrophic impact.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

Longevity Factors vs. Shortened Lives Examining Important Concepts

Although we are living longer lives in the US, we are living sicker lives. As one researcher pointed out, lifesaving medical interventions can often help prolong life, but unfortunately, this appears to be accomplished by lengthening the morbidity phase once sickness has occurred.

By
Robert J. Marshall, PhD, DACBN and Linda L. Forbes, DC, LAc, DACBN

Case History

PATIENT (D.W.) Age: 66 Sex: Female Ethnicity: Caucasian

By
Keith L Volstad, DC, DABCI, DACBN

Seven Foods High In Manganese That Help Prevent and Treat Diabetes Mellitus Type 2. Is Manganese The Key Mineral for Improving Insulin Sensitivity? A Commentary on the Available Research

In 2013, Rodriguez, et al, conducted a study of 573 school children between 8 and 13 years of age. The study found that adequate manganese intake in girls may prevent insulin resistance and diabetes type 2 in the future.

By
Adrian Isaza, DC, DACBN

Phytochemicals & Cancer

Abstract: Although traditionally, cancer has been fought with the usual armamentarium chemotherapy and high dosages of directed radiation, lately there has been more attention devoted to combating cancer thru nutritive means. In particular, certain phytochemicals including some vitamins, some minerals and a wide range of other bioactive nutrients have been found useful in the physiological battle against cancer. Often, these phytochemicals can be used as a first line of therapeutic defense against cancer before chemotherapy and radiation treatment is commenced.

By
Jerrold J. Simon, DC, DACBN, CCN, DACRB, FACCN, DABDA, FACCRS, FICC

Coconut Oil – the “super substance”?

What do we know about coconut oil? Coconut oil comes from the meat of matured coconuts harvested from the coconut palm. It is used in food, medicine and in industry. Coconut oil is high in saturated fat content, and because of it, it has a long shelf-life. Coconut oil has been demonized in the past because it contains saturated fat. In fact, coconut oil is one of the richest sources of saturated fat known to man. It has been shown that almost 90% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are saturated.

By
Keith L Volstad, DC, DABCI, DACBN

Some Thoughts On Sudden Cardiac Death – Part III

In parts I and II of this series I presented the large body of research that definitively demonstrates the intimate relationship between less than optimal potassium status and cardiac dysfunction, with particular emphasis on sudden cardiac death. Then, in part II I presented the disturbing research that makes it clear that many prescription diuretics, the use of which is growing significantly in our society, can make a major contribution to low serum potassium levels (hypokalemia). However, even though diuretic usage is high, can diuretic use alone explain the significant incidence of potassium depletion and its potential adverse impact on cardiac health? I would guess no. Why? Of course, as nutritionists, our first and most logical answer to this question would be poor dietary intake. Given that potassium is primarily found in fresh, whole foods and green, leafy foods in particular, it cannot be denied that this suggestion has merit in a society that has a massive rate of refined food intake.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

The Cholesterol Hypothesis: good science or bad politics?

For the last 50 years or more, we have been told to fear cholesterol and saturated fat as the cause of heart disease. Cholesterol is not the enemy and this article will prove that fact. The vast majority of the information regarding cholesterol has been the result of politics rather than good scientific research.

By
James P. Seim, DC, DACBN

DNA Methylation and Cancer: Is it Hypo- or Hypermethylation or Both?

"Epigenetics can be defined as somatically heritable states of gene expression resulting from changes in chromatin structure without alteration in the DNA sequence, including DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling.”

By
Wayne Sodano, DC, DABCI, DACBN, CFMP, BCTN

Some Thoughts On Sudden Cardiac Death – Part II

IN PART I OF THIS SERIES, I reviewed two papers that make it unmistakably clear that optimal potassium intake and metabolism are very crucial and very under-appreciated factors that need to be considered in relation to a health care tragedy that continues to take people, both young and old, away from the friends and relatives who love them most, all too often and very unexpectedly: sudden cardiac death. Unfortunately, when a relatively unknown issue in the health care community is only addressed by a small amount of papers, many in the health care community may not give this issue the attention it deserves.

By
Jeffrey Moss, DDS, CNS, DACBN

Clinical Uses of Curcumin

Curcumin (Curcuma longa) has been used in clinical settings for multiple treatment protocols including inflammation. Curcumin and the spice Tumeric have demonstrated their ability to both prevent and relieve inflammation due their chemical constituents. This paper intends to discuss the herb Curcuma Longa and its active properties including the main mechanisms of action, review of established clinical benefits of Curcumin, including the clinical benefits for inflammation.

By
Daniel Czelatdko, DC, CCSP, DACBN